so, as the title suggests, i&#39;m think ing of switching to xmonad for my wm...  my Q is:  how much haskell do i need to know to use it effectively?  at the moment i am pre-alpha grasshopper status in my haskell coding skills, (i know haskell exists and is high on my list of languages to learn) though i don&#39;t want to have to become a haskell guru in order to be able to use xmonad.  so really, what&#39;s the learning curve like to start using xmonad?<div>
hex<br clear="all"><div><br></div>-- <br>my blog is cooler than yours: <a href="http://serialhex.github.com" target="_blank">serialhex.github.com</a><div><br></div><div><font color="#999999"><span style="border-collapse:collapse;font-family:arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px">The wise man said: &quot;Never argue with an idiot. They bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.&quot;</span><br>
</font><pre><font face="&#39;courier new&#39;, monospace" color="#999999">&gt; &gt; Other than the fact Linux has a cool name, could someone explain why I
&gt; &gt; should use Linux over BSD?
&gt;
&gt; No.  That&#39;s it.  The cool name, that is.  We worked very hard on
&gt; creating a name that would appeal to the majority of people, and it
&gt; certainly paid off: thousands of people are using linux just to be able
&gt; to say &quot;OS/2? Hah.  I&#39;ve got Linux.  What a cool name&quot;.  386BSD made the
&gt; mistake of putting a lot of numbers and weird abbreviations into the
&gt; name, and is scaring away a lot of people just because it sounds too
&gt; technical.
        -- Linus Torvalds&#39; follow-up to a question about Linux</font></pre></div><br>
</div>