<div dir="ltr"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex"><span style="font-size:13px">And those who do... do they really use it in a way that would manifest this breakage?</span></blockquote><div><span style="font-size:13px"><br></span></div><div><span style="font-size:13px">Never mind, this is obviously the case; I just had to refresh my mind on what the difference was between the two implementations. (Continuation gets called with original vs latest state.)</span></div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br clear="all"><div><div class="gmail_signature">-- Dan Burton</div></div>
<br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Jan 20, 2015 at 10:19 AM, Dan Burton <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:danburton.email@gmail.com" target="_blank">danburton.email@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div>Do people actually *use* the MonadCont class? And those who do... do they really use it in a way that would manifest this breakage?</div><span class=""><div><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex"><span style="font-size:13px">basically every existing user of the instance is pretty much guaranteed to have breakage.</span></blockquote><div><br></div></span><div>It seems the answer to these questions is "yes" and "yes." I'm curious to hear more.</div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><br clear="all"><div><div>-- Dan Burton</div></div></font></span><div><div class="h5">
<br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Jan 20, 2015 at 10:02 AM, Ross Paterson <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:R.Paterson@city.ac.uk" target="_blank">R.Paterson@city.ac.uk</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><span>On Wed, Jan 21, 2015 at 12:09:13AM +1100, Ivan Lazar Miljenovic wrote:<br>
> This is what I thought: I just wanted to make sure that I wasn't<br>
> missing something (especially since there's no real documentation that<br>
> I could find as to _how_ liftCallCC' fails to satisfy the laws of a<br>
> monad transformer).<br>
<br>
</span>Any lifting of callCC should satisfy<br>
<br>
        lift (f k) = f' (lift . k) => lift (callCC f) = liftCallCC callCC f'<br>
<br>
and liftCallCC' doesn't.<br>
<div><div>_______________________________________________<br>
Haskell-Cafe mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org" target="_blank">Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div></div></div>
</blockquote></div><br></div>