<p dir="ltr">Your question is if I understand correctly, whether we can think of a type that has a law abiding Eq instance that gives equality as fine grained as extensional equality (meaning structural equality?) but for which no law abing instance of Ord can be given such that a <= b && a >= b ==> a == b</p>
<p dir="ltr">This boils down to the question whether on each set with an equality relation defined on it a total ordering (consistent with the equality relation) can also be defined. One counterexample is the complex numbers.</p>
<p dir="ltr">Does that answer your question?</p>
<p dir="ltr">Cheers!</p>
<div class="gmail_quote">On Jan 1, 2015 3:27 PM, "Tom Ellis" <<a href="mailto:tom-lists-haskell-cafe-2013@jaguarpaw.co.uk">tom-lists-haskell-cafe-2013@jaguarpaw.co.uk</a>> wrote:<br type="attribution"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">On Thu, Jan 01, 2015 at 03:22:55PM +0100, Atze van der Ploeg wrote:<br>
> > i want it to be at least as fine grained as extensional equivalence<br>
><br>
> Then see Oleg's comment or am i missing something here?<br>
<br>
Perhaps you could explain Oleg's comment.  I don't understand it.<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Haskell-Cafe mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org">Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe</a><br>
</blockquote></div>