<div dir="ltr"><div>I'm afraid I can't offer you any solutions yet, but here's how we do it:</div><div><br></div>We run our own hackage and have a wrapper around cabal that uses a separate sandbox for each git branch. We also have one repository that contains most of our cabal projects, submodules add a lot of overhead. This all works well for local development but causes some problems with CI since we can only increment version numbers on the master branch, non-master builds need to checkout and build from the repository. I'd like to be able to use git hashes as version numbers, and thinking about it it may actually fit into our current workflow. I'll have to try it out :)<div><br></div><div>- Adam</div><div><div><br><div><br></div></div></div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Dec 15, 2014 at 1:34 PM, Carl Eyeinsky <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:eyeinsky9@gmail.com" target="_blank">eyeinsky9@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div><div>Hi Daniel (and other readers),<br><br><br></div>the use case is that if I have several versions of the private dependency.<br><br>I.e I develop a project A, and after a while I find, that part of it wold be useful to break out to another package, so I make a package X and list it as dependencie. Here, 'add-source' works. BUT, some time later I'm done with A, and start developing B, and include X as a dependencie. Then, I find that X could use some improvements -- but after these my project A probably breaks due to these changes. The solution, of course, is versioning, but I think 'add-source' doesn't help there anymore (right?), unless I copy the head to another directory and do the improvements there.<br><br>This last mentioned way (of leaving a trail of previous versions) is a manual way of version management. What I was thinking of is that, is there some paved solution available (short of running my own Hackage, which some do, as I've been reading.)<br><br>Sorry -- I should have been much more explicit!<br><br><br></div>Cheers,<br><div> <br></div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><div><div class="h5"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Dec 15, 2014 at 10:00 AM, Daniel Trstenjak <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:daniel.trstenjak@gmail.com" target="_blank">daniel.trstenjak@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><br>
Hi Carl,<br>
<span><br>
> I'm wondering what do you guys use as the general method in developing projects<br>
> using your own private projects?<br>
<br>
</span>Using a 'cabal sandbox' and its command 'add-source' to add a local<br>
library seems to be the way to go.<br>
<br>
<br>
Greetings,<br>
Daniel<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Haskell-Cafe mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org" target="_blank">Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br clear="all"><br></div></div><span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888">-- <br><div><div dir="ltr"><div><div dir="ltr"><div></div>Carl Eyeinsky<br></div></div></div></div>
</font></span></div>
<br>_______________________________________________<br>
Haskell-Cafe mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org">Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div></div>