<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body text="#000000" bgcolor="#FFFFFF">
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">Kim-Ee Yeoh comments my reading
      suggestion:<br>
      <br>
    </div>
    <blockquote
cite="mid:CAPY+ZdSUbdusEeowBFMoPBrQN7K32pkfL9zWLmoqzr6H7jyEkQ@mail.gmail.com"
      type="cite">
      <div dir="ltr">
        <div class="gmail_extra">
          <blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0
            .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
            <div id=":1n3" style="overflow:hidden">"Indiscrete Thoughts"
              by Gian-Carlo Rota, published by Birkh&auml;user in 1997.
              Available on the Web. [I forgot where]<br>
            </div>
          </blockquote>
          <br>
        </div>
        <div class="gmail_extra">I'm rather fond of Rota's two volumes
          of musings. For the purpose of furthering the quality of
          philosophizing, would it not be better served citing the
          relevant chapters, if not the actual page numbers?<br>
          <br>
        </div>
        <div class="gmail_extra">As you took note, the book covers a
          swathe of topics.<br>
        </div>
      </div>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    Shall I also give the line numbers, Kim-Ee? The book of Rota is
    divided into parts and chapters, with titles. It is not so difficult
    to find quickly that something may (or not) interest you. What is a
    "relevant" chapter in a collection of philosophical essays?<br>
    <br>
    You might skip the "biographies" of some mathematicians, with some
    unpleasant fragments, if you are not interested. <br>
    I liked a few others.<br>
    <br>
    Part II, Ch. VII: "The Pernicious Influence of Mathematics Upon
    Philosophy" is an inspired attack addressed at the "analytical
    philosophers" who felt really offended!&nbsp; (This is a reprint from the
    Journal of Metaphysics, published also in the book "18
    Unconventional Essays on the Nature of Mathematics", Springer, ed.
    by&nbsp; Reuben Hersh. I also recommend it [also on the Web], it is
    plenty of serious wisdom, although sometimes hard to read.) <br>
    This chapter deals with the non-philosophical essence of logic, with
    the "philosophical vacuity" of formal definitions. Very inspiring.<br>
    <br>
    For Rota the question of IDENTITY is more important than that of
    EXISTENCE. The chapter XII: "Syntax, Semantics, and the Problem of
    the Identity of Mathematical Items" (p. 151) begins his presentation
    of the subject, which continues&nbsp; later. Rota exposes some reasoning
    based on his favourite philosophical topic, the phenomenology,
    continuing previous sections. This may not convince you (e.g. if you
    are an orthodox materialist...), but you might learn something.<br>
    <br>
    The chapter about /Fundierung/ (XV, p. 172) in which Rota fights
    against the reductionism, may give you a headache. But you should
    survive.<br>
    <br>
    <br>
    Anyway, /a ciascuno il suo/.<br>
    <br>
    Jerzy K.<br>
    <br>
  </body>
</html>