<div dir="ltr"><blockquote style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex" class="gmail_quote">I bet you can find an abundance of C programmers who think that<br>
&quot;strcmp&quot; is an intuitive name for string comparison (rather than compression, say).</blockquote><div><br></div><div>But at least, &#39;strcmp&#39; is not a common English language term, to have acquired some unintentional &#39;intuition&#39; by being familiar with it even in our daily life. The Haskell terms, say, &#39;return&#39; and &#39;lift&#39;, on the other hand, do have usage in common English, so even a person with _no_ programming background would have acquired some unintentional &#39;intuition&#39; by being familiar with them.<br>


<br>

</div><div>And in that light, _for_me_, &#39;lift&#39; is more _intuitive_ than &#39;return&#39; or &#39;pure&#39;. It seems, to me, like the thing being &#39;lifted&#39; from a given world into a more &#39;abstract&#39; world.<br>

<br></div><div>

Of course, I recall reading somewhere: a poet is a person who uses the different words to mean the same thing, while a mathematician is a person who ascribes more meanings to the same word.<br>
</div><div><br>Haskell, being originated from _mathy_ people, we do get to _enjoy_ this effect.<br></div><div>Having said this, it has actually helped me build a different type of &#39;intuition&#39; for words and I do enjoy it.<br>




<br></div><div> <br></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br clear="all"><div>Thanks and regards,<br>-Damodar Kulkarni<br></div>
<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Aug 7, 2013 at 6:40 AM, Richard A. O&#39;Keefe <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:ok@cs.otago.ac.nz" target="_blank">ok@cs.otago.ac.nz</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">




<div><br>
On 6/08/2013, at 9:28 PM, J. Stutterheim wrote:<br>
<br>
&gt; That argument makes sense, although I find it a bit counter-intuitive still.<br>
<br>
</div>In discussions like this, I have never been able to discover any meaning for<br>
&quot;intuitive&quot; other than &quot;familiar&quot;.  Applying &quot;pure&quot; to an IO operation doesn&#39;t<br>
go against *my* intuition because Haskell has *trained* my intuition to<br>
see &#39;putStrLn &quot;Hi&quot;&#39; as a pure value; it&#39;s not the thing itself that has effects,<br>
but its interpretation by an outer engine, just as my magnetic card key has by<br>
itself no power to open doors, but the magnetic reader that looks at the card<br>
_does_.  I don&#39;t attribute agency to the card!  I&#39;m not arguing that my<br>
intuition is _right_, only that it is _different_.<br>
<br>
In particular, for anyone who has much experience with Haskell, &quot;return&quot; is<br>
almost the only name that could possibly be intuitive because that _is_ the<br>
name that is familiar.  Haskell programmers who&#39;ve got used to Applicative<br>
will also find &quot;pure&quot; intuitive, *because it is familiar*.<br>
<br>
I bet you can find an abundance of C programmers who think that<br>
&quot;strcmp&quot; is an intuitive name for string comparison (rather than compression, say).<br>
<div><div><br>
<br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Haskell-Cafe mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org" target="_blank">Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div></div>