<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=windows-1252"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><br><div><div>On 2 Jun 2013, at 16:48, Brandon Allbery &lt;<a href="mailto:allbery.b@gmail.com">allbery.b@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr">On Sun, Jun 2, 2013 at 7:22 PM, Ting Lei <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:tinlyx@gmail.com" target="_blank">tinlyx@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div>In particular, I wanted to avoid having an IO in the return type because introducing the impurity<br></div>
<div>(by that I mean the IO monad) for this simple task is logically unnecessary. All examples involing</div></blockquote><div><br></div><div style="">Anything that comes into or goes out of a Haskell program is in IO, period. If you have an FFI function which is guaranteed to not change anything but its parameters and those only in a pure way, then you can use unsafeLocalState to "hide" the IO; but claiming that when it's not true can lead to problems ranging from incorrect results to core dumps, so don't try to lie about it.</div>
<div>&nbsp;</div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div>&nbsp;a C string I have seen so far involve returning an IO something or Ptr which cannot be converted back to a pure String.</div></blockquote><div><br></div><div style="">Haskell String-s are *not* C strings. Not even slightly. C cannot work with Haskell's String type directly at all. Some kind of marshaling is absolutely necessary; there are functions in Foreign.Marshal.String that will marshal Haskell String-s to and from C strings.</div>
<div style=""><br></div><div style="">(String is a linked list of Char, which is also not a C char; it is a constructor and a machine word large enough to hold a Unicode codepoint. And because Haskell is non-strict, any part of that linked list can be an unevaluated thunk which requires forcing the evaluation of arbitrary Haskell code elsewhere to "reify" the value; this obviously cannot be done in the middle of random C code, so it must be done during marshalling.)</div>
</div></div></div></blockquote><br></div><div>I'm not convinced that that's "obvious"  though it certainly requires functions (that go through the FFI) to grab each character at a time.</div><div><br></div><div>Thanks</div><div><br></div><div>Tom Davie</div><br></body></html>