<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Apr 29, 2010 at 12:38 AM, Ketil Malde <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:ketil@malde.org">ketil@malde.org</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div class="im"><br>
Don Stewart &lt;<a href="mailto:dons@galois.com">dons@galois.com</a>&gt; writes:<br>
<br>
&gt; <a href="http://shootout.alioth.debian.org/u64q/haskell.php" target="_blank">http://shootout.alioth.debian.org/u64q/haskell.php</a><br>
<br>
</div>Observations:<br>
<br>
Although we&#39;re mostly beaten on speed, and about the same on code size,<br>
we&#39;re using a lot less memory than Java.<br>
<br>
As for code size, the programs are heavily tuned for speed.  Although it<br>
is nice to show that we can indeed be fast, Haskell&#39;s forte is being<br>
almost as fast while clear and compact.  Is it an idea to go back a few<br>
steps to more idiomatic code?  Perhaps as a separate &quot;track&quot;?  I also<br>
worry a bit that source code optimization for a specific compiler makes<br>
it more difficult to take advantage of compiler optimization<br>
improvements.<br></blockquote><div><br>I was thinking the same thing with regard to the code being idiomatic Haskell.  Then I took a look at the top entry (in GCC C), which has special malloc/free functions to achieve cache alignment.  Then I realized just how nice the current Haskell version is :)<br>
<br>Jason<br></div></div>