<div dir="ltr">I guess it depends on the final use cases... you could use currying to partially evaluate some stuff ready, locked and loaded as it were but the example you have ¬†given shows to distinct functions pres1 and pred2.<div><br></div><div>I guess the short answer is "yes" but it depends on how you do it!<br><br>:)<br>Sean</div><div><br></div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On 16 November 2015 at 11:44, Mark Carter <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:alt.mcarter@gmail.com" target="_blank">alt.mcarter@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Suppose I want to use an argument twice, as for example in the expression:<br>
(\x -> (pred1 x) and (pred2 x))<br>
<br>
Is there a shorter way of doing this?<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Beginners mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Beginners@haskell.org" target="_blank">Beginners@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://mail.haskell.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/beginners" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://mail.haskell.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/beginners</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br></div>